A British study has found that financial services employees possess less honesty, less loyalty, and less self-discipline than the average British worker.  That is not exactly great news for people with money in banks or with brokers, and than is most of us. This reports shows quite clearly that the reputations of bankers have fallen on hard times as their compensation packages have grown.

From the article: “Roger Steare, Professor of Organisational Ethics at Cass Business School, has completed some intriguing research into the banking industry’s morals. He put more than 700 executives working in financial services firms through integrity tests. These financiers were as a group less honest, less loyal and had less self-discipline than the average British worker. Professor Steare believes that the lack of self-discipline in the profession indicates a culture of greed and short-termism.”

Much of this study revolves around the sizes of bonuses being paid in the British banking industry despite the hard times upon which the industry has fallen, and how out of step those bonuses appear in a time of lagging profits. The study may show that the average worker is not too happy to see people that are losing them money profiting from the experience. They may simply see it as Bad Business.

Roger Steare, Professor of Organisational Ethics at Cass Business School, has completed some intriguing research into the banking industry’s morals. He put more than 700 executives working in financialservices firms through integrity tests. These financiers were as a group less honest, less loyal and had less self-discipline than the average British worker. Professor Steare believes that the lack of self-discipline in the profession indicates a culture of greed and short-termism.”

Much of this study revolves around the sizes of bonuses being paid in the British banking industry despite the hard times upon which the industry has fallen, and how out of step those bonuses appear in a time of lagging profits. The study may show that the average worker is not too happy to see people that are losing them money profiting from the experience. They may simply see it as Bad Business.

The Apollo Group, which owns the online University of Phoenix, has been found guilty of securities fraud and ordered to pay $270 million to a group of investors. The problems stem from the cover-up of a report that was highly critical of its recruiting practices. Apollo felt that the report was biased and that it would put off investors in the company. A federal court has now disagreed. Get more helpful information about Corporate Christmas eCards from this website www.ecards2go.com.

Stephen Basser, attorney for the Policeman's Annuity and Benefit Fund of Chicago, the lead plaintiff in the class-action lawsuit, said the amount is among the largest-ever verdicts in securities litigation. He said such cases usually are settled before trial or dismissed. When they do go to trial, defendants often prevail, as did former technology highflier JDS Uniphase in a monster case that ended a couple of months ago.

Although the verdict will be costly if upheld, the news of the resolution of the suit has had a positive impact on Apollo stock. "The Street always seems to like things when they're resolved, even if the resolution is negative," said Trace Urdan, who follows Apollo for brokerage firm Signal Hill. "The uncertainty is gone." Put another way, resolving Bad Business issues is good for business.

After five rather unspectacular years, Bill Ford is stepping down from the CEO post at his grandfather's firm and is handing the reigns to Boeing executive Alan Mulally.

The change comes as a surprise and perhaps as a sign of just desperate things have become at  Ford (Public, NYSE:F), the nation's second largest automaker. The hope is that Mulally will be able to bring his turnaround talents to the Dearborn based company.